Joshua Allen Online

The Business Of Child Abuse: The Good, The Bad, The Corruption

Posts Tagged ‘Foster Care

Big government foster care: For mediocrity to triumph, indifferent people do little.

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Big government foster care: For mediocrity to triumph, indifferent people do little.

(It takes a murder to kickstart reform)

The Business of Child Abuse

By Joshua Allen

(First published at Americanthinker.com)

Residents of Los Angeles County, reeling from allegations of gross incompetence and probable negligence by Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS), have been blessed with the creation of a blue ribbon commission, set up by county supervisors.  The allegations arose after social workers and supervisors failed to prevent the torture and murder of a young child in Palmdale, despite ample evidence that the child was in great danger.

DCFS director Browning moved to immediately fire four employees associated with this tragedy.  Seeking to fire employees so quickly is in itself is a kind of reform, since union rules, including a ridiculous appeal process, make it almost impossible to fire a social worker for mere incompetence.  Similar incompetence once resulted in a two-week suspension.  Just ask Rocio La Voie.

Ms. La Voie received a ten-day suspension for actions not so different from the incoherence exhibited by the four employees associated with the horror in Palmdale.  Indeed, Ms. La Voie believed that her original suspension was too harsh, and appealed it!

Mr. Browning has his hands full with recalcitrant unions, a much too high percentage of impossible-to-fire employees, and politicians who have gotten it wrong, decade after decade.  During the past 15 years, the number of children in foster care has decreased from a top of over 65,000 to a little over 21,000 today.  Yet the budget for DCFS is within about 10% of what it was, when foster care placements were at a peak.  By any measure, this large reduction in foster care placements, while maintaining a similar budget, should have resulted in significant savings, as well as a huge improvement in overall care for our abused and neglected children.  Yet there has been no savings, and by all accounts, no improvement in overall care.

In the Palmdale case, Mr. Browning has shown a willingness to take on the union, as a first small step towards real reform.  However, it wasn’t such a difficult call, since the incompetence demonstrated by these workers was so egregious.  The test will come from future cases, which won’t have a tortured child and extensive media coverage.

So where are we now?  And what reforms will this blue ribbon commission recommend?  It is difficult to imagine that the head of this commission doesn’t already know what recommendations shall come out of the current investigation.  Some of us worry about the “power of pedigreed professionals.”

The head of the commission is David Sanders.  David Sanders was a previous director of DCFS for three years and couldn’t fix things then.  Not even close.

Later, after three other directors left (one for the Casey Foundation), Sanders wanted his old job back.  Sanders lost out to Browning and is now, with the commission, in a perfect position to “ankle-bite, and peck away.”

Sanders worked for the Casey foundation for over a decade and advocates the implementation of Casey’s foster care agenda, which has always included keeping children away from foster care as long as possible, maintaining and supporting at-risk families, and seeing foster care as a solution only in the most extreme cases.

Some worry that this emphasis on family reunification and keeping birth families together at all cost, while noble, risks keeping abused and neglected children in birth homes for too long a period, risking further abuses.

The county now wants to hire an additional 150 social workers and extend training for up to a year.  An earth-shaking event occurred recently when a social worker in training recently flunked out of the Academy.  The shortage of social workers was so acute that everyone who entered this training Academy would pass.  Think about that for second, and be very afraid.  DCFS director Browning has promised to put a stop to this practice, and there is no reason to doubt his word.

And finally, the most recent kerfuffle is the continuing drama of children’s services inability to find placements within 24 hours, for foster children removed from their homes.

Social workers, unable to find placements for these children, put them in holding cells or err centers euphemistically called the “Children’s Welcome Center.”

The holding locations don’t have enough volunteers to properly feed and or manage the needs of infants, or maintain order, in controlling a volatile mix of young teens from various backgrounds.  The police were called on more than one occasion.  This is reminiscent of the old McLaren Hall, which in the bad old days sort of functioned as a jail for foster children, who couldn’t be placed in foster homes.

To be fair, no child spent more than a few days in these holding centers.  And nobody believes that it’s optimal — not even the Times, who get to write about it every six months or so.  The situation is so bad that various nonprofit law firms are threatening lawsuits and fines to force the county to allocate funding to mitigate the problem.  A tall order during bankrupt times.

The publicity surrounding the torture death of Gabriel Fernandez in Palmdale caused an increase in the number of calls to the hotline.  The county had more foster children than they could handle.  Ominously, this meant numbers of abused children would not have come to the attention of authorities without the publicity from this murder.  Director Browning plans to increase contracting with nonprofit foster agencies to meet the demand for bed space.

However, the concern, as always when it comes to agency nonprofits, is how far DCFS will go in overlooking unscrupulous practices to assure that the county has enough bed space (read: money) for abused and neglected children?  Audits have shown mismanaged spending and large financial handouts to friends and families.

There was always an unwritten rule that as long as the children are properly cared for, the county would kind of, sort of overlook tens of grand here and there, as long as one doesn’t take too much.  Unless, of course, a child dies, in which case all bets are off.

Part of the problem is how CEOs of foster agencies received county contracts.  Contracts were awarded to individuals who were not properly vetted and were unqualified.  Often minority politics played a role toward obtaining contracts.  Proposals were accepted, if completed properly, and if the agency had enough initial money to begin operations.

Agency board members were never scrutinized; one was recently found to be in prison while still serving on the board of directors.  It was not necessary for CEOs to have college degrees; CEOs needed only to delegate necessary tasks to those who did have proper qualifications.  At some foster agencies, board members, and CEOs, were some of the least educated, and most unqualified, among their own employees!

However, all this is old news, and the real scandal is that once again, it took the torture and death of an innocent child to trigger momentum towards reform.  Momentum, which will eventually peter out, until the next child dies.

And we begin the process all over again.

Written by joshuaallenonline

September 6, 2013 at 9:39 am

Posted in Child Abuse

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Teens Happy Homes contract terminated.

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Teens Happy Homes contract terminated.

The Business of Child Abuse

By Joshua Allen

The county supervisors have voted to terminate the contract of Teens Happy Homes.  The closure of the corrupt agency, has been inevitable since the first Times article appeared weeks ago.

The highlight from the Times investigation were the transcripts, and actual audio excerpts,which were secretly recorded 3 years earlier, in 2010, by Askari Moyenda.  The recordings, memorandum of understanding, and links to the audit, have previously been posted.

What is new, and which will be linked here, is a copy of the deposition of Beautina Robinson by Mr. Moyenda.  

The deposition, which took place on August 28, 2012, is a bit tedious, especially since Ms. Robinson seems to be the only one represented by counsel.

But it does open a window into the type of individual written about here, and elsewhere, which sully the image of foster care in Los Angeles.

In the deposition, we learn that Ms. Robinson didn’t know if the county prohibited solicitations for personal gain,.  Also, she doesn’t recall if she received nearly $10k personally.

She can’t recall when she got a check for almost $10k? …     Huh?

Actually, Ms. Robinson says, “I don’t recall,” so frequently throughout the deposition, that one wonders what she actually did remember.

Robinson couldn’t recall for example, when she was asked what the qualifications were, when she became an executive director of a foster agency.

On another question, Ms. Robinson noted, that she learned that selling a non-profit was illegal, “During the process of this.”

Other enlightening tidbits, have to do with the qualifications of sitting board members, (presumably proof of life).

Near the end of the deposition, there is a long, twisted and rambling question and answer session, about what Ms. Robinson considers to be fraudulent, lying, misleading and misrepresentative, when she is communicating with board members.

Finally, towards the end of this confusing repartee, Mr. Moyenda asks:

Question:  “Okay.  Would you consider it fraud if you –if an administrator –if an executive –chief executive officer misled the board on the amount of donation that was given, would you consider that fraudulent?”

Answer:  “I refuse to answer that.”

We found it a bit more confusing (if that is possible), when Ms. Robinson was asked about her education.  She went to Oakwood Academy College, …”went to Indiana University and took some classes,” and has an “honorary doctorate degree.”

Then, the following questions and answers ensues:

Question:  “Slow down.  So you have what?  I’m sorry?”

Answer:  “An honorary doctorate degree.”

Question: “What does that mean?”

Answer:  “Just what I said.”

Question: “I don’t know what that means.”

Answer: “Well I don’t either.”

Question: “Is that related to any education?  Is the honorary degree related to any education?”

Answer: “Humanities.  I have a doctorate in humanities.”

At this point, Mr. Moyenda seems to be trying to get Ms. Robinson to state the honorary degree is useless.  Things ramble a bit, until he asks…

Question:  “Okay.  So there was no educational attachment to that honorary degree?  Yes or no?”

Answer:  “I don’t recall.”

Not exactly the Supreme court, or even Matlock, but one hopes the gist comes through.

There is a lot more, and it is a worthwhile read, if for no other reason then to highlight the lack of professionalism and utter incompetence we allow, by the people who run these places.  For that alone, the plaintiff has clearly done us a service.

One doubts however, the “pound of flesh,’ even when served cold, will bring much peace.

It is ironic that a foster child, whose entire life fits inside a plastic garbage bag, could shoplift a $50 IPOD, and get booked, fingerprinted, photographed, and tossed into jail.

Yet when previous corruption was exposed, similar, and in some cases much worse than the goings on at Teens Happy Homes, there was nothing more than a slap on the wrist to the perpetrators.

Currently, there are agencies in Los Angeles County, with similar proclivities.  Should there be no legal consequences for perpetrators, then crooked executives from other agencies, will know the only thing risked, is to be shut down.

Monies need not be paid back or returned, and there will be no incarceration, regardless of the extent of the malfeasence.

Money meant for abused and neglected children has been siphoned.  This requires justice. For the children, and for us, the taxpayers.  Such malfeasance is a bit more rare these days, but still not unusual with foster care agencies.

A couple agencies come to mind immediately.

Financial corruption invites mistreatment, in one form or another, towards foster children. Such corruption, over time, often ends with a foster child dying.

There is a correlation.

It has happened time, and time again – and shall coninue to happen all too frequently, unless we make changes with honest appraisal.

Joshuaallenonline.com

Written by joshuaallenonline

June 12, 2013 at 5:00 am

Teens Happy Homes sinking fast.

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The second shoe has begun to drop, and it now appears that Teens Happy Homes will soon be closed.  You can read about it here.

Garett Therolf continues to do stellar work on this story, and it is nice to see the media take an interest in the subject, and do the good investigative work necessary, to bring about a bit of improvement in the lives of the foster children, attached to this agency. This is important stuff.

However, as usual, at other suspect agencies, malfeasance alone, is not enough to warrant many words on the subject, or action by regulators.  Or for that matter, action by law enforcement.

Malfeasance, must be accompanied by child deaths or significant injuries, before any action is taken, to bring some culprits to moderate justice.  

An example of this can be seen with United Care, which was closed a few years ago.  In one of the below recordings given to the Times,  consultant Jorge Gutierrez, when speaking about Craig Woods and United Care, pointed out that it wasn’t the death of Viola Vanclief that caused United Care to be closed.

Rather it was Craig’s “stubbornness” in not paying back the bulk of the money, which the county said, had been illegally siphoned by a former employee.  (Almost $250,000).

At United Care, an innocent toddler was murdered, before malfeasance warranted a heavy hand by the county, which shut down the agency.

Similarly, another agency was shut, fairly recently, accompanied by similar financial wreckage, payments to felons, and encompassed a plethora of  creepy individuals, enough to turn one’s stomach.

However, in the case of this other agency, there wasn’t a lot of child welfare violations.  This circumstance warranted minimal media attention, despite missing funds amounting to hundreds of thousands of dollars.  Not sexy enough?

Things are different with Teens, but why did it take so long?

Part of the real story, is that Teens fiscal audit is not yet completed, after 3 years!  Much of the information should have been acted upon, much earlier.

Sincere kudos, to Ms. Watanabe, who admitted county auditors dropped the ball with Teens.  And yet, officials, and media, were warned, by this author and others, in 2010, regarding many similar allegations.

Malfeasance, as well as child welfare issues, at Teens, were continuously ignored.

But why?

Surely this garbage dump was an open secret.  Social workers, current and previous staff members, must have stiff necks from looking the other way all the time.

Obviously at Teens, and quite clearly, one dare says, at other agencies,  payment for minimal or nonexistent work, occurs with willful blindness, by staff, and regulaters.  In some places, it is blatant.

Ask away!  An arrow shall be pointed, (as continues to be done here), to obvious culprits. Yet, under these circumstances, how could child welfare not suffer?

There are good agencies.  There are hard working social workers, who do such work with nobel intentions.  There are wonderful foster parents, who save children’s lives.

All are tainted, by too many greedy, bad apples.

The warnings, are a broken record.  And the guilty, attack the sources, who are afraid for their jobs, and have learned the hard way, that nothing will be done.

There will be no justice.  Either for the cheated children, or the crooks. Nobody will face criminal charges, let alone be banned from working with abused and neglected children.

Are things different now?  Can they be?

Joshua Allen

Draft of allegations by auditor controller.

Written by joshuaallenonline

May 14, 2013 at 7:48 pm

Audio Files of Teens Happy Homes board meeting in 2010 with management consultant Jorge Gutierrez

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Audio Files of Teens Happy Homes board meeting in 2010 with management consultant Jorge Gutierrez

These audio files make fascinating listening.  Anyone interested in the machinations of what goes on at these board meetings, are in for a treat.

The source of the audio, Askari Moyenda, turned over the recording to the LA Times, which put the links up on their site.  Special admiration for Times reporter Garett Therolf, who has done excellent reporting on the sordid happenings at Teens Happy Homes.

It is curious though, that the recordings from a 2010 board meeting have surfaced now, three years after the fact, for reasons unknown.   (cui bono?)

A lot of things have happened, during the past three years at Teens, much of it quite questionable, according to recent reports.

We are grateful for this opportunity to hear these discussions from three years ago, by some of the individuals, entrusted with the care of our abused and neglected children.

Just one question though:  Are there any other recordings?  Inquiring minds …

Written by joshuaallenonline

May 7, 2013 at 5:41 pm

Teens Happy Homes: The Not So Mighty are Falling

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IMG_0277Teens Happy Homes: The Not so Mighty are Falling:

By Joshua Allen

Big trouble for Teens Happy Homes.  That’s the gist of the article by Times reporter Garett Therolf.  You can find the article here Here:

We once again learn what we already knew.  Teens, is not the sort of place best suited to helping abused and neglected children.

Sadly, the same cast of characters shows up time, and time again, at these places.  Their names are no stranger to these pixels…

Truly, we have been writing, and shouting in the wind, about these and other miscreants for over 3 years.  Nobody seemed to care.

And even those high up on the food chain – very high up – would just tell us, “There was nothing they could do.”

One source of ours used the words “…small potatoes,” when asked why the county officials did nothing to stop, or even discourage such unethical and apparently illegal practices.

We wrote about Beautina Robinson before. Her agency, Teens Happy Homes, is the same agency, where the head of DCFS Browning, is quoted as saying needs to be under a “heightened level of scrutiny.”  After another Times story regarding the murder of the Chinese graduate students near USC.

Dr. Milani and Askari Moyenda, oh dear…. The latter recorded a board meeting, and played the recording for the Times reporter.  Such intrigue!  And why are we hearing these tapes now, three years later?

On tape. Beautina Robinson is heard:

“I’ve taken care of the board that needed it personally, myself, and I would prefer the board, keep it that way.”

Holy Jeepers, is this happening at any other agencies? Yikes!

And then this other stuff.  It’s funny how lawsuits tend to air dirty laundry.  Well a little funny I suppose, unless you are a foster child, in which case it’s not very funny at all, since everyone is busy fighting over, “…a dispute over control of the agency.”  Which, as a distraction, couldn’t have been good for the abused and neglected children.

According to the Times:

“Under the agreement, Moyenda and Milani were called investors.” They were promised the ability to appoint three members of the seven-person board of directors.”  

Yeah, um, okay…   We detest this sort of thing.

The consultant mentioned here: Gutierrez?  Does anyone remember the agency he ran?  Who is his “good friend,” at the auditors office?  What was he told?  And, when was he told it?  Maybe he can send a ‘cease and desist,’ to the LA Times…see how well that works.

There are others. Names joked about with contempt or disgust. They continue to bounce back into the Business of Child Abuse, either here in LA, or with a fresh start and path to riches in another county.  As the old saying goes:  Old corrupt foster agency people don’t fade away, they just end up in San Bernadino.

A question though, why is San Bernadino so desperate for our droppings?

Mr Browning, the head of DCFS is quoted by the times as saying:

 “…that he was startled to learn of the depth of problems at Teens, and that he was enlisting the help of retired homicide detectives to examine allegations of child abuse and financial malfeasance at foster care contractors.”

We believe this, and would be happy to point the way to the more egregious examples, should anyone be interested.  Oh wait…we have… “I’m shocked, shocked, that there is gambling in this casino.”

Our major premise here has always been this.  Child welfare will always suffer when financial irregularities and unethical practices are overlooked as a matter of policy, because, such investigations are difficult, and too hard to prove.

And therefore, this is what you get.  Unfortunately, children had to die, before there was even a chance that officials would take a hard look at the books.

Supervisor Molina’s frustration seems palpable.  Holy gee…we can finally, at last, …end the contract with Teens Happy Homes.”  Sort of, Maybe, Kind of…We’ll see….

After only 10 years of troubles too.  And to think, it only took Wall Street half that long to bring down our economy!

There will now be a mad scramble, an unseemly exhibition actually; where some agencies will solicit, and probably offer some type of compensation, to either social workers or foster parents, in order to garner the revenue stream from the abused and neglected children, who will now be leaving Teens Happy Homes.

We have seen it before, many times.

Written by joshuaallenonline

April 29, 2013 at 8:48 am

Posted in Child Abuse

Tagged with , ,

Who Failed Jacqueline Charlotte Castillo?

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Jacqueline Castillo committed suicide over a year ago on March 20, 2012.  Jacqueline had lived on and off in foster care for years, and was currently residing in a transitional living facility run by a local Catholic entity.  

Transitional Living, helps teens adjust to leaving the foster care system, instead of just throwing them in the street.  The latter happens all too often, especially if the foster teen is a bit troublesome and difficult to place because of negative behaviors.  In that case, they system often just gives up on them and these teens are quickly emancipated at 18.  

However, this was not the case with Jacqueline, who was a young mother, raising her infant child.  She was connected to various private non-profit, and public agencies, designed to assist her with young motherhood, and a productive life in the private sector.  

To this end, Jacqueline had a job in retail.  She continued to receive social services from various entities, all of which provided social workers, and presumably, some type of mental health therapy.  

We use the term “Presumably,” because, when contacted, the religious based entity which controlled her living arrangements, refused to answer any questions, despite privacy no longer being an issue, because she is deceased.  

Our main question has always been this:

Before her death, did a social worker or therapist, threaten Jacqueline, that her baby was going to be placed into foster care, or the “system,” if she didn’t behave in a way they (the therapist, the social workers, the transitional house, the religious entity), found acceptable?  

Did Jacqueline believe she was going to lose her baby, after a conversation with someone associated with one of the above, like a social worker or therapist?

Who Failed Jacqueline Charlotte Castillo?Image

Written by joshuaallenonline

April 11, 2013 at 6:20 pm

If I Wanted Foster Care To Fail:

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Big Government Foster Care: If I Wanted Foster Care to Fail.

The Politics of Child Abuse
By Joshua Allen

I saw a viral video awhile back.  The video has several million hits by now.  You can see the video here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZ-4gnNz0vc
We were inspired a bit, and borrowed the format to our focus on Child Abuse and Foster Care issues.  So with credit and due appropriately proffered, here is our take.

If I Wanted Foster Care to Fail:

I would create an “Academy,” where new County Social Worker (CSW) applicants train, before working with abused and neglected children.  In this academy, not one applicant would ever flunk out.  Never. Every applicant would pass, and become a CSW, despite idiocy, incompetence and mental illness.

Strange, angry, ignorant, or slow social workers would be mixed in with the competent, stellar, and dedicated. Thus the entire department would be tainted, and appear foolish, because of a few (too many) individuals.

If I Wanted Foster Care to Fail:

I would make it almost impossible to fire http://articles.latimes.com/2010/oct/29/local/la-me-child-abuse-20101029 any county social worker. Incompetent, or mentally challenged workers, would be transferred to departments and locations where they did minimal harm – for a while.

If I Wanted Foster Care to Fail:

I would provide as few educational benefits as possible for abused and neglected children. Then foster teens could return home, or age out of the system, with minimal tools and skills.  Numerous foster teens would be homeless or incarcerated. http://blogcritics.org/culture/article/children-aging-out-of-the-foster/
Donations would be solicited from the community , with minimal financial oversight.  Monies set aside for educational purposes would be misspent by unscrupulous executives.  Executives who, with minimal work and even less education, want to be rich overnight.

At rubber chicken affairs, I would trumpet educational achievements of a few hand-picked foster teens that did well, despite horrific adversity.  http://www.nyc.gov/html/acs/html/pr_archives/pr26_07_12.shtml

However,  at the same time, I would ignore  thousands of foster teens who fail to graduate, can barely read, and are almost 4 times more likely to need Special Education.  https://docs.google.com/document/d/1v2t5_QanRAIhCX97XIK1tUfRbE5cRrYCLxaGtlw_Hww/edit

If I Wanted Foster Care to Fail:

There would be no accountability for foster agency executives to account for their working day. Auditors would examine time cards as if they were recorded by Mother Teresa.  Underlings, or coworkers, would never be questioned to determine if executives actually did anything .

Executives from agencies would be Board Members of their own agency.  Board of Directors would include friends and family, who would  evaluate their own job performances.  Executives would set their own salary, authorize their own bonuses, and dole out contract caseloads to friends and family.  Conflicts of interest would be ignored by county politicians, who with a shrug would say, “There was nothing they could do.”

Gross mismanagement would never be grounds for an executive being removed, or board members being held to account. Never. Taxpayer money would be considered grains of sand.

Not one board member would ever suffer consequences when they knowingly allow a director to mismanage, steal from, or damage foster children.

If I Wanted Foster Care to Fail:

Social workers would spend the majority of their time on paperwork, documenting the 10% of their time they actually spent helping abused and neglected children.
In reports, social workers would learn to document fake percentages and goals, to demonstrate statistical success.  Measurements, and goals documenting progress, would be obsessed over.  A typical observation would read like this:

“Baby Johnny’ will scream and throw objects once per day rather than 3 times daily, Showing a 75% improvement by the end of this quarter.”
Hundreds of regulations, rules, policies and procedures would be created, which only a retired-in-place bureaucrat could understand.  And policy makers would believe every new rule and bit of paperwork, actually improved the well being of abused and neglected children.

If I Wanted Foster Care to Fail:

County lawyers would be responsible for a caseload of 200 abused and neglected foster children.   Therefore, many attorneys would do a mediocre job protecting abused and neglected children.

At Children’s Court,  hearings would last 5 minutes.  Birth Parents would meet their lawyers for the first time a few minutes before their hearing. Lawyers for foster children would be paid the lowest hourly rate for any attorney in the county, creating a weak incentive for highly skilled attorneys to engage in child welfare.

If I Wanted Foster Care to Fail:

Caseloads of Contract Social Workers would not be cross checked across county lines.  Contract social workers will have many cases beyond what is allowed.   Abused and neglected children would then receive minimal contact, or assistance from their social worker.  Those entrusted to monitor such things would turn a blind eye.

If I Wanted Foster Care to Fail:

I would move abused and neglected children to 4 or more homes during their time in foster care. The norm would be minimal stability, bonding, or nurturing at this horrible time in their lives.

Foster children would be given minimal information regarding their cases or dispositions.  Anxiety and depression, caused by bad policies and apathy, would be typical.

Concepts such as “Fast Tracking,” would be ignored by judges and social workers alike, who give birth parents 3rd, 4th, 5th, even 6th chances over several years. Frequent delays, all in the name of  “keeping the family together,” would do exactly the opposite.

If I Wanted Foster Care to Fail:

I would believe politicians when they say we are well on the way to fixing things, even though they said the same thing year after year, while hiring 5 new heads of Children’s Services during the past decade, http://californiaschildren.typepad.com/californias-children/2011/08/trish-ploehn-56-chief-of-the-los-angeles-county-department-of-children-and-family-services-is-expected-to-be-reassigned-to.html  while repeating the same old promises we call lies.

I would accept as gospel, policy decisions originating from university and communications think tanks, from ‘scholars’ and ‘experts,’ who live as far away from MLK Blvd, Korea Town and Santa Ana as class and money provide.

A professor or Esteemed Professional who adopted a foster child cared for by nannies, would be a consecrated expert.  Yet the foster parent from Santa Ana, who raised 3 children to productive adulthood, would be locked out of any discussion, because of difficulty with English fluency, problems negotiating a prominent universities map, and difficulty arranging child care for 12 hours.

If I Wanted Foster Care to Fail:   

In a huge county like Los Angeles I would assign 1 or 2 newspaper reporters, to occasionally cover events regarding foster care, child abuse, and family court.
Foundation publicists, and sideways talking politicos, would control the conversation.  Investigative journalism would be minimized as non-news worthy, ‘solution based journalism’ (Foundation Speak), would rule the Huffingtons.

If I wanted Foster Care to Fail:
Not one birth parent would ever be held legally accountable, for making false accusations against the foster parents who care for their child.  The damage such false accusations cause to children, would be considered a normal part of the business of child abuse.  Lying, and false accusations by a birth parent, would be met by a slight admonishment and lecture, without consequences, or other measures of deterrence.

If I Wanted Foster Care to Fail:

I would teach Foster Children, Foster Parents, and Social Workers to ignore hypocrisy, and accept lies, stupidity, and deceit as a normal part of Children Services, something impossible to change.  I would teach that the only way an idealistic worker could survive and continue, is by accepting defeat.

Pathetic money wasting programs such as “Wrap Around,” and poorly run programs like “Family Preservation,” would never be challenged, or improved.  An alliance of vested financial interests, along with government monitors, who fear answering for their failures, would continue year after year.

Such programs and agencies would provide owners,  a top 1% income, and lifestyle, which the typical foster child, will never know, and only dream of ;  “ …from just across the bay.”

So Basically, it’s this.

If I Want Foster Care to Fail:

I Would Do Nothing at All.     I Would Do Nothing at All.     I Would Do Nothing at All.

Joshua Allen Online
The Business of Child Abuse

Written by joshuaallenonline

September 10, 2012 at 8:57 pm

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